Sunday, August 28, 2016

'Maestro' looks into the world of classical music through the eyes of world-renowned conductor Paavo Järvi

Fredericnewspost
Imade Borha
25/08/2016

Filmmaker David Donnelly and Frederick native Curtis Jewell intended to make the documentary “Maestro” on how classical music is dying until they hit a wall. Donnelly even wrote a Huffington Post article on the demise of classical music and utilized Jewell as a consultant to create the production company Culture Monster. But something was missing.
“When we first started making the creative process, I really went broad and started focusing on classical music as a genre and the challenges it’s facing, as far as orchestras failing, and it became very dismal. And also, it really felt like a PSA spot,” Donnelly said. “So, after testing it to different audiences, this was about a year and a half into it, it hit me, you know what, there’s no human element and that’s really what we need.”
Thanks to Donnelly’s decision to regroup, the more personal “Maestro” can be pre-ordered for a Sept. 5 iTunes release. There are even hopes for a Frederick screening. The film has already received a flood of international attention. It’s been translated in 10 languages and it’s been airing on networks across five continents. The film has supporters in Japan, Australia, Germany and South America who have sent fan mail.
All this came after Donnelly went next door to find the subject of his documentary. “I had moved back to Cincinnati from Los Angeles. Paavo Järvi, who is the star of the film, was my neighbor in the condo building that I lived in,” Donnelly said. “Paavo kind of introduced me to classical music again by telling the stories of the music. So he was really putting it into context for me and each week, I would come to his performances and I was so excited because he was selling me on a story.”
Järvi is the chief conductor of NHK Symphony Orchestra and served as the music director for the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra from 2001 to 2011. Donnelly’s film crew followed Järvi on his world travels, where he directs several orchestras, including Orchestre de Paris. But before all of this, Donnelly had to address Järvi’s concerns. “You know, it’s very taboo in classical music to be personal and vulnerable, whether you’re missing a note or [exposing] your personal life,” Donnelly pointed out. “Lines are drawn between that in the classical world which hurts them in many ways in connecting with people.”
Jewell witnessed Donnelly’s enthusiasm win Järvi over. “I think Paavo realized the passion that Dave was bringing to the project and that allowed more doors to be opened on his end.”
Donnelly and Jewell, who are former Washington University football teammates, tapped into their athletic background to capture the prodigious skill of classically trained musicians including Lang Lang, Joshua Bell and Hillary Hahn. “So what I tried to do with the film is show classical music in a new way,” Donnelly said. “I did that by illustrating classical musicians like professional athletes, showing the discipline and the training and sacrifice that is required.”
Sometimes, these world-class musicians would outsmart the camera. “For our sound mix, we had syncing issues all the time because the classical musicians, they play so fast that sometimes the camera would not pick up the movements for closeup shots and so forth so we had some sync issues we had to keep reworking.”
Donnelly poured his life into completing the complicated process of filming and post-production. “I lived out of a suitcase and traveled to six different countries and 25 cities while we were filming ‘Maestro.’” Once the cameras were put down, colossal problems emerged. “There were 50 music cues in the film, of which each one requires master rights and sync rights clearances and publishing rights clearances. There was over 1,000 contracts for this film.”
The seemingly endless red tape was for a greater cause. DVDs of “Maestro” are available for classroom use. Donnelly witnessed this impact first hand in surveying 300 Ohio students. Only a handful previously attended a classical music concert. “Eighty-three percent of them, they were more likely to go to a classical music concert after the film. Most of them, I think the average was, on a scale from 1 to 10, how much they liked it, 1 being they hated it and 10 being they loved it, it was 8, I think that was the average. That feedback means so much more to me than anything else.”
Jewell hopes that “Maestro” will one day be shown in his hometown since he still benefits from the lessons he learned as an orchestra student. “I wound up developing interests in philosophy and literature and other places that helps me educationally ... that I can pass on to future generations.”
This goal to enrich lives through classical music is what kept Donnelly and Jewell going despite film setbacks. “It’s four years of my life and I have 58 minutes to show for it,” Donnelly said. “It’s a grind. You have to wake up and hustle, but what I love about it, it’s all passion. All passion.”
http://www.fredericknewspost.com/news/arts_and_entertainment/maestro-looks-into-the-world-of-classical-music-through-the/article_d1266cbd-7432-5c5b-a425-9636a6b7b554.html

Tuesday, August 09, 2016

Paavo Järvi Leads the Mostly Mozart Orchestra in a Program of Mozart and Beethoven That Was ‘magnificent...in every way’

Huffingtonpost.com
Christopher Johnson
08/08/2016

At the close of Friday night’s Mostly Mozart concert in Geffen Hall, Paavo Järvi and the Festival Orchestra brought down the house with Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony—and how many times do you get to say that of anyone these days? You might think that everything that could be done with this piece had already been done a thousand times over, but you would be wrong.

Without reaching or pulling anything out of shape, Järvi took a piece that’s usually programmed as a familiar makeweight and clattered through in a quaintly calisthenic manner (“Well, it’s not the Fifth, you know.”), and played it as if it were bran-new, fresh as paint, and thrillingly important. Tempi were perfectly judged: a rocket-ride of a first movement, erupting out of a truly mysterious introduction; a real, singing Adagio, with heart-stopping rubato; a zingy scherzo-menuet, torquing down perfectly to a floaty, sly trio; and a lightning-quick, hilarious finale with a mock-breakdown just before the end that got a spontaneous Chris Matthews-style shout of laughter from somewhere audience-left. (If Järvi ever gets tired of the conducting game, he’s got a great career as a comedian ahead of him.) Counterpoint was brought to the fore and brilliantly played. The syncopations in the first and third movements—usually slammed so hard that they confuse the beat rather than pointing it—were perfectly controlled, played for wit and winkingly varied each time around. And you could hear where this piece sat in its time, combining Haydn’s punch and vigor with Mozart’s dash and sheen, while opening a door not only to many of Beethoven’s most important later developments, but to Schubert and Rossini as well.

And let’s not waste words about the performance: it was magnificent in virtually every way. Järvi is musical down to his toes, and watching him work is almost as much fun as hearing the result. The Festival Orchestra, which is on a roll this year, played beautifully, even for them. It is hard to believe that a group so cohesive, so attuned within itself, so united in its ensemble and so eloquent in its expression, only works together for—what?—six weeks out of the year. Järvi gave out solo and sectional bows all around, and the orchestra, which plainly adores him, insisted that he take one, too—and a good long one, at that. Richly deserved. Bravo, one and all.

Before intermission, the New York chapter of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Coughing performed a rousing reenactment of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918, with backup provided by Järvi and the clarinet virtuoso Martin Fröst. Järvi got the ball rolling with Arvo Pärt’s La Sindone, a short but typically intense piece composed for the Turin Winter Olympics in 2005 and revised just last year, and Fröst followed up with Mozart’s clarinet concerto, played on a basset instrument in what must have been a close approximation of the concerto’s long-lost original form. Under the circumstances, the players might have been forgiven for marking the notes, taking their checks, and going home; instead, Järvi and the orchestra gave what looked like a passionate, deeply committed account of La Sindone that might have been riveting in better circumstances, and Fröst physicalized the Mozart with impressive vigor, although you didn’t actually have to hear what was going on to see that tempi throughout the piece were startlingly fast, and that Fröst paid closer attention to the concertmaster than to the conductor, frequently getting out of synch at vital structural points. Still, the crowd awarded Fröst two cell-phone fanfares (both exquisitely placed during the Adagio, for maximum effect), a howling ovation, three extra bows, and an encore (his brother Göran’s brilliant Klezmer Dances).

It was all very puzzling. The Mozart concerto is as close to perfection as music comes, and for all that it was the last instrumental piece Mozart completed before his final illness, it radiates joyful ease in the outer movements, and a kind of quivering peace in the great Adagio. In this performance, however, everything seemed pressed forward, and the notes often tumbled over one another without really landing. The Adagio, which started in slow waltz-tempo and picked up speed as it went along, wound up being chiefly memorable as an opportunity to witness Fröst’s legendary legato and awesome breath-control. (For reference, in Fröst’s latest recording of the concerto, which he also conducts, the Adagio clocks in about a minute faster than Jack Brymer’s 1986 recording, which Fröst credits with inspiring him to take up the clarinet in the first place, and more than two minutes faster than Brymer’s classic 1958 recording with Sir Thomas Beecham.) To see what was missing, you had only to wait for principal clarinetist Jon Manasse’s three short solos in the Beethoven Adagio, which arose softly, hesitantly, from the surrounding orchestral fabric and then blossomed into passionate, full-toned utterance, taking as much time on each note as felt right, supported with tender care and exquisite precision by Järvi and the other players. These were magical moments, filled with all the existential wonder and quietness of heart that the Mozart should have had, but didn’t.

Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival presented the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra with Paavo Järvi, conductor, Martin Fröst, Clarinets, on August 5-6, 2016, David Geffen Hall, in the following program:

PÄRT La Sindone
MOZART Clarinet Concerto in A major, K.622
BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major, Op. 60

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/zealnyc/paavo-jarvi-leads-the-mos_b_11388980.html

Paavo Järvi, 
au nom du père


Letemps.ch
Julien Sykes
01/08/2016

Fils du chef estonien Neeme Järvi, Paavo Järvi, 53 ans, est l’un des grands chefs du circuit international. Il évoque ses années de formation en Estonie puis aux Etats-Unis, auprès de plusieurs pédagogues. Rencontre




Tel père, tel fils. Paavo Järvi est chef d’orchestre, comme son père Neeme Järvi. L’œil bleu teinte nordique, le crâne rasé, il en impose. Mais il reste d’une courtoisie exemplaire. Il fallait le voir, ce week-end, répéter avec le Verbier Festival Orchestra entassé dans la salle de gymnastique d’une école: «C’est possible de mettre plus d’accents sur les levées?» Les gestes amples, précis, il sait faire confiance aux musiciens tout en sachant exactement ce qu’il veut.

Paavo Järvi, 53 ans, est né dans une famille de musiciens comparable à la dynastie Bach, au XVIIIe siècle. Lui et son frère Kristjan Järvi ont embrassé le même métier que leur père. Au sein de la dynastie Järvi, on dira que Paavo est le plus doué. Le chef a acquis une longue expérience au contact de divers orchestres. Avec la Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie de Brême (qu’il dirige depuis vingt ans), il a enregistré une intégrale très remarquée des symphonies de Beethoven. Une interprétation tout à la fois moderne dans l’esprit et influencée par les instruments d’époque. Il y a un an, il quittait l’Orchestre de Paris pour prendre les rênes de l’Orchestre symphonique de la NHK de Tokyo.
Traverser le Rideau de fer

Né en 1962 à Tallinn, Paavo Järvi a pu voir son père à l’œuvre nuit et jour. «Il occupait tous les postes à Tallinn, à l’Opéra comme à l’orchestre symphonique. Mon père nous a toujours inclus dans ses activités. Nous pouvions assister aux répétitions, et c’était normal d’aller à tous ses concerts et aux soirées d’opéra.» Une immersion 24 heures sur 24. «Aux alentours de minuit, après les représentations d’opéra, il organisait encore des répétitions avec son orchestre de chambre!» Avec sa sœur flûtiste Maarika Järvi (établie aujourd’hui à Genève) et son petit frère, le noyau familial voue un culte à la musique. Paavo s’est mis d’ailleurs à la percussion. «Il n’y a pas de compétition entre mon frère et moi. Nous avons dix ans d’écart. J’en ai 53, lui 44, et il s’est spécialisé dans un répertoire très spécifique qui inclut aussi d’autres types de musiques.»

A l’époque sous domination soviétique, l’Estonie restait isolée du bloc occidental. Dans les années 1970, Neeme Järvi était l’un des rares chefs à pouvoir voyager à l’Ouest, avec des orchestres russes. Passionné par les questions d’interprétation, il ramenait des disques de ses tournées en Europe. «Je me souviens avoir écouté la Passion selon saint Matthieu de Bach et la Messe en si de Bach par Harnoncourt et le Concentus Musicus de Vienne, ou encore la Messe de Bernstein. Il y avait aussi un grand coffret des Symphonies de Mozart par Karl Böhm et l'intégrale des 104 Symphonies de Haydn par Antal Dorati, que nous étions parmi les premiers à posséder en Union soviétique.»

S’ensuit le départ aux Etats-Unis, en 1980. «A l’époque, l’URSS était une société très corrompue. Tout était affaire de relations, et mes parents ont tiré profit d’un problème de santé que j’avais pour appuyer notre départ.» Sitôt arrivé à New York, Paavo Järvi entre en classe préparatoire à la Juilliard School et part étudier la direction d’orchestre au Curtis Institute of Music de Philadelphie. Par chance, il assiste à un séminaire d’été, à Los Angeles, avec Leonard Bernstein – un souvenir qui l’a marqué à vie. «Il était si dynamique et si incroyablement charismatique. Sa santé n’était pas des meilleures, il fumait comme un pompier, mais sitôt qu’il commençait à diriger, il sautait, il était comme un adolescent.» Le jeune Estonien mesure alors le fossé qui le sépare encore d’un «grand».
Apprentissage à la dure

Son premier poste à la tête de l’Orchestre symphonique de Malmö, en Suède (1994-97), équivaut à un baptême du feu. «Rétrospectivement, j’ai commis beaucoup d’erreurs, aussi bien dans l’interaction avec les musiciens que dans le management. Quand vous avez à peine la trentaine et que vous avez en face de vous des musiciens chevronnés, certains de 60 ans, vous n’êtes encore qu’un gamin! Ces musiciens connaissent mieux chaque œuvre que vous!» Un apprentissage à la dure, donc, mais terriblement formateur.

Aujourd’hui, Paavo Järvi n’a plus grand-chose à prouver. Il domine un panel de styles très large. Il enregistre à tour de bras, et annonce une intégrale des symphonies de Sibelius à paraître chez Sony avec l’Orchestre de Paris (à laquelle s’ajoutera un CD Ravel). A son meilleur, il allie une grande précision rythmique à l’expressivité. «Comme pour tout, il faut trouver un juste milieu – je ne parle pas de compromis. Prenez Brahms: il n’a pas mis d’indication de tempo métronomique pour ses symphonies. C’est qu’il invite les musiciens à prendre certaines libertés et à exprimer un point de vue artistique, sachant très bien que celui-ci varie d’une personne à l’autre.» Une variété au service de la vérité.

https://www.letemps.ch/culture/2016/08/01/paavo-jarvi-nom-pere

Tuesday, August 02, 2016

Rebellen im Kulturbetrieb

Frankfurter Allgemeine
CHRISTIAN MÜSSGEN
25/07/2016

In Bremen spielt eines der besten Orchester der Welt. Dahinter steckt ein besonderes Modell – mit Musikern in Doppelfunktion.


Die Violinen flirren, die Flöten, Oboen und Klarinetten setzen ein. Und gemeinsam schwingt sich das Orchester zu den letzten Takten der Reprise auf, jenem Zwischenteil, der den Weg für das große Finale in diesem Meisterwerk in e-Moll ebnet. Doch bevor das Allegro non troppo seinen Höhepunkt erreicht, klopft Paavo Järvi mit dem Taktstock auf das Dirigentenpult. „Das muss präziser werden, mit mehr Kraft und Energie“, ruft er. Die Konzertmeisterin an seiner Seite wünscht sich „mehr Dynamik“, und auch der Klarinettist aus der letzten Reihe meldet sich zu Wort. Järvi hört sich alles an, gibt ein paar knappe Anweisungen und lässt bei Takt 381 neu starten. Dann knallen die Paukenschläge, die Kontrabässe dröhnen und der erste Satz von Brahms Sinfonie Nr. 4 endet mit einem Donnerhall.
In der Pause knabbert Järvi ein paar Karotten- und Apfelstücke. „Brahms ist eine große Herausforderung“, sagt er. Nicht etwa, weil die Komposition ungenau sei oder der Künstler zu viel Spielraum für Interpretationen gelassen habe. Ganz im Gegenteil: „Er war ein Perfektionist, seine Partituren sind wissenschaftlich genau austariert.“ Für manche Orchester wirke dies wie eine Zwangsjacke. Nicht aber für die Kammerphilharmonie Bremen: Zusammen mit diesem Ensemble studiert Järvi, einer der erfolgreichsten Dirigenten der Welt, seit November einige Stücke von Brahms ein. Und langsam beginnt die Musik zu atmen - auch weil die Musiker nicht passiv bleiben, sondern sich aktiv in die Diskussion einbringen. „Ich kenne kein Orchester, das so genau arbeitet und an jeder einzelnen Note feilt“, sagt Järvi, 53 Jahre alt, der in Estland geboren wurde und einen amerikanischen Pass hat.

Fast sieben Stunden lang Proben

Die Kammerphilharmonie Bremen ist ein außergewöhnliches Orchester, und das in jeder Hinsicht. Schon der Proberaum - eine renovierte Aula der Gesamtschule Bremen-Ost, in der die Musiker an diesem Tag fast sieben Stunden lang proben - fällt aus der Reihe. Er liegt mitten im Problembezirk Osterholz-Tenever, wirkt nüchtern-funktional und sieht eher nach einem ambitionierten Laienorchester aus, als nach dem Klangkörper von Weltrang, der dort seit einem knappen Jahrzehnt residiert.
Die eigentliche Besonderheit des Orchesters ist aber seine gesellschaftsrechtliche Struktur. Die Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen gGmbH gehört komplett ihren Musikern. Jeder Instrumentalist ist Gesellschafter und mitverantwortlich für den künstlerischen und wirtschaftlichen Erfolg. Die Proben laufen daher anders als in den meisten Staatsorchestern. „Wir sind selbstbewusst und laufen nicht bloß dem Dirigenten hinterher“, sagt die Bratschistin Friederike Latzko. „Wir wollen mitreden, schließlich hängt unsere Existenz davon ab, dass wir ein Spitzenniveau erreichen.“ Der Erfolg gibt den Bremern recht.
http://www.faz.net/aktuell/wirtschaft/kammerphilharmonie-bremen-rebellen-im-kulturbetrieb-14355475.html

Friday, July 22, 2016

Paavo Järvi: tahaks vaba aega, kuid see vist jääbki unistuseks

Kultuur.err.ee
Anette Sõna
13.07.2016
Klassikaraadio saates "Suvila" käis külas dirigent Paavo Järvi, kes rääkis nii Pärnu muusikafestivalist, Eesti festivaliorkestrist, dirigeerimiskursustest kui ka enda dirigeerivatest orkestritest.
Paavo Järvi ja Eesti Festivaliorkester.Foto: Kaupo Kikkas
Kui inimesed tulevad Pärnusse puhkama ja suverõõme nautima, siis dirigent Paavo Järvi tunneb küll hästi sõna "suvepuhkus", kuid siiani ei seda temal veel olnud. Küll aga on Järvil pärast Pärnu muusikafestivali üks vaba nädal, mil ta loodab veidi puhata ning Pärnut nautida.
Kuna Järvile tundub, et Eestis on hästi suure potentsiaaliga muusikuid, siis Eesti festivaliorkester võiks olla justkui taimelava, kus noored eestlased saavad istuda kõrvuti läänemaailma tippmuusikutega, nendega mängida, omandada kogemusi ning samal ajal luua kontakte, mis avab uksi.
"Teiseks, meil on Eestis palju häid kollektiive nagu koorid, kuid Arvo Pärt on võib-olla ainuke inimene, kes on tõeliselt maailmastaar," sõnas Järvi. "Mis puutub orkestritesse, siis ma tahan, et meil oleks üks orkester läheks läbi nähtamatust klaaslaest. Et meil ei oleks ainult Balti ja eesti muusikat mängiv grupp, vaid selline, mida võetaks maailmas sama tõsiselt kui üht maailma parimat orkestrit," lisas dirigent.
Järvi unistus on olnud kokku panna erakordselt kõrge ja ühtlase kvaliteediga orkester, kus kõik inimesed on missioonitundega. Ta soovib, et orkestris ei oleks muusika ainult töö, vaid nauding.
Pärast Pärnu muusikafestivali ootab festivaliorkestrit eest Dmitri Šostakovitši kuuenda sümfoonia salvestus. "Ühest küljest on see natukene julge eksperiment, kuna tema sümfooniat on väga heade orkestritega plaadistatud küllaltki palju," lausus Järvi. Ometi on tal tunne, et festivaliorkestril on ka sellele teosele anda midagi juurde.
Hiljuti lahkus Järvi Pariisi orkestrist ning see ei tulnud kerge südamega. "Kui oled mingi orkestriga töötanud 6–7 aastat, tekib lähedase inimese tunne. Siiski on õigel ajal lahkumine ja selle tunnetamine tähtis," ütles Järvi. Ta lisas, et dirigendid on nagu külalised – tuleb osata minna õigel ajal.
Pariisi orkester oli dirigendile ainulaadne, kuna orkestril oli hing, mitte erakordselt hea masinavärk, nagu inglise orkestritel tehnilises üleolekus. "Pariisi orkester muutub ühtlaselt hingavaks organismiks ning on kapriisne, samas tundlik," sõnas Järvi.
Jaapani ringhäälingu orkestrit on Järvi dirigeerinud nüüd aasta. Dirigendi meelest on selles orkestris hoopis teine mõtlemine. "Seal võetakse kõike erakordselt tõsiselt, tullakse proovi ette valmistatult ning tuntakse piinlikust, kui ei olda perfektsed. Nendele on aukohutus mängida hästi."
Järvile on huvitav, kuidas muusikategemine käib kokku maa üldise kultuuriga. "Neil on nii kõrge tase nagu ameerika orkestritel, kuid nad on delikaatsema lähenemisega," ütles Järvi.
Pärnu muusikafestivalil saab kuulda nii viiuldaja Viktoria Mullovat kui ka ooperilaulja Matthias Goernet, kes on kõige parem Gustav Mahleri laulude interpreet maailmas. "Ta on musikaalne, ilusa ja mahlase tämbriga ning muutub selleks karakteriks, keda ta laval laulab," sõnas Järvi.
Järvi meelest on erakordne, kuidas üks inimene võib end ümber kehastada selleks karakteriks, keda ta laulab. "Näiteks Mahleri lauludes on iga laul eriteemaline, temaatika on filosoofiline, seal on Vana-Hiina poeesia.Tema oskab loogiliselt, veenvalt, huvitavalt avada iga loo väikese maailma."
Dirigeerimiskursustel soovitab Järvi ka noortel muutuda nendeks karakteriteks, mida lugu kehastab, kuna dirigeerimine on ka mingisuguse muusikakarakteri edasiandmine.
Kui kursustel näeb dirigent kahesuguseid inimesi. Ühtedel on erakordselt loomulikud käed ning kooskõla hingamise ja taktilöömise vahel. Teised on intellektuaalsemad, kuid pole võib-olla kodus nii tehnilise küljega. "Püüan igal inimesel leida momendid, millele keskenduda," sõnas Järvi.
Lisaks tuli Järvil tunne, et oskab nüüd dirigeerida, umbes aasta tagasi. "Tegelikult ma ei ole päris kindel, sest mõnikord läheb see tunne ära," lisas ta.
"Kui oled noor, siis arvad kogenematusest, et oskad dirigeerida. Dirigeerimine põhineb paljuski kogemusel, repertuaari tundmisel," ütles Järvi.
Samuti tunnistas dirigent, et kõige huvitavam on tal Pärnus, kuna festivaliorkestri tulevik on talle väga tähtis. Kultuuriministeerium, Eesti 100, EAS ning privaattoetajad on andnud orkestrile võimaluse tegeleda pikemaajaliste projektidega. Siiski soovib Järvi leida rohkem ettevõtjaid, kes hindavad väärtust ning leiavad, et nende toetamine on Eestile hea.
"Tahaks ka vaba aega, kuid see vist jääbki unistuseks," ütleks ta viimaks.
http://kultuur.err.ee/v/muusika/8a71d824-c940-40b0-8bca-0b38916318b3/paavo-jarvi-tahaks-vaba-aega-kuid-see-vist-jaabki-unistuseks

Die Esten drängen nach Westen


Faz.net
JAN BRACHMANN
20/07/2016

Paavo Järvi macht das Musikfestival in Pärnu konkurrenzfähig für Europa und wird ab 2017 einen Teil davon exportieren. Das wird für Unruhe in der europäischen Festivallandschaft sorgen.

© KAUPO KIKKAS
Nichts bleibt schläfrig, nichts verwaschen: Paavo Järvi probt mit dem Estonian Festival Orchestra in Pärnu.


Im Menuett fahren die Rhythmen Achterbahn, bis mit einer sensationellen Pause die Notbremse gezogen wird. Der Witz zündet auch beim zweiten Mal; die Wiederholung steigert seine Wirkung sogar. Da zeigt sich der Könner. Das Finale ist ein Tanz auf der Tenne. Über den Fagott-Bordunen fliegen die Spelzen, die vom Dreschen übriggeblieben sind. Dazwischen fliegen Beine und Röcke: So klingt ein lustiges Beisammensein der Landleute. Nach dem letzten Ton der Sinfonietta Riga entlädt sich die Begeisterung der Hörer in Pärnu. Es muss nicht immer Gustav Mahler sein. Man kann die Leute auch mit Joseph Haydn vom Hocker reißen: Symphonie Nummer 104, D-Dur. Aber dazu muss man Haydn dirigieren können. Nach einem wahren, bösen Wort von Marek Janowski gibt es nämlich in der Welt zu viele schlechte Mahler-Interpretationen und zu wenig gute Haydn-Aufführungen. Paavo Järvi kann Haydn.

Er kann auch Carl Nielsen, dessen zweite Symphonie - „Die vier Temperamente“ - er mit seinem eigenen, 2011 gegründeten Ensemble, dem Estonian Festival Orchestra, aufführt. Hochkonzentriert wird musiziert, alle Details sind durchgearbeitet: das Pingpong der Akzente zwischen Violinen und Hörnern, Wechselgesänge zwischen den Gruppen des Blechs, zielgerichtete Schärfekurven in den zweiten Geigen. Nichts ist pauschal, nichts schläfrig, nichts verwaschen.

So wie Iván Fischer sich sein Budapest Festival Orchestra und Claudio Abbadosich sein Lucerne Festival Orchestra zusammengestellt haben, so suchte sich auch Paavo Järvi aus allen Orchestern der Welt, bei denen er gearbeitet hatte, die besten Musiker aus: von Estland bis Griechenland, von Großbritannien bis Tokio. Der Geiger Florian Donderer, Konzertmeister der Deutschen Kammerphilharmonie Bremen, ist dabei sein drittes und viertes Ohr oder „meine zweite rechte Hand“, wie Järvi sagt.
Ein erfahrener Orchesterpsychologe

Paavo Järvi, in Estland als Sohn des nicht minder großen Dirigenten Neeme Järvi geboren, verbrachte viele Kindheitssommer in Pärnu, bevor die gesamte Familie die Sowjetunion verließ. Der Ort war im neunzehnten Jahrhundert durch den baltendeutschen Bürgermeister Oskar Brackmann zu einem mondänen Seebad ausgebaut worden mit eleganten Kurhäusern am drei Kilometer langen Sandstrand der Ostsee (die hier im Juli mehr als zwanzig Grad warm wird) und mit malerischen Holzvillen, die noch heute Schnitzzierrat wie aus geklöppelter Spitze tragen.

In Pärnu traf sich später die Musiker-Elite der Sowjetunion. David Oistrach empfing hier Freunde auf seiner Datsche. Es gibt auch einige Schwarzweißfotos, auf denen der kleine Paavo mit Dmitri Schostakowitsch zu sehen ist oder mit Aram Chatschaturjan, dem er im Sommerhaus dessen „Säbeltanz“ auf dem Xylophon vorgespielt hatte. Nachdem Estland 1991 zum zweiten Mal in der Geschichte seine staatliche Unabhängigkeit erlangte, sind auch die Järvis - inzwischen sämtlich Bürger der Vereinigten Staaten - künstlerisch in ihre alte Heimat zurückgekehrt.

Neeme Järvi überredete den Bürgermeister von Pärnu im Jahr 2003, eine neue, schmucke, gut klingende Konzerthalle zu bauen. Ihr großer Saal fasst - bei herrlicher Beinfreiheit - knapp 900, der Kammersaal 170 Menschen. Seit 2010 leitet Paavo Järvi hier das Pärnu Musikfestival. Neben dem international zusammengesetzten Festivalorchester gibt es drei Ensembles der Järvi-Akademie für hochbegabte Nachwuchsmusiker. Das Kammerorchester vereint die Teilnehmer internationaler Meisterkurse des Festivals. In der Sinfonietta spielen junge estnische Streicher unter der Leitung des technisch hochversierten Dirigenten Arkady Leytush, der zugleich ein erfahrener Orchesterpsychologe ist. Das Jugendorchester der Järvi-Akademie ist gewissermaßen die große Gruppe aus allem zusammen.

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/buehne-und-konzert/jaervi-mach-musikfestival-in-paernu-konkurrenzfaehig-fuer-europa-14347899.html

Paavo Järvi Paul van Dykist: tippu jõuda on raske ja veel raskem on seal püsida

Postimees.ee
Kirke Ert
12/07/2016
Laupäeval astub Tallinna lauluväljakul Electronic Family festivalil tantsumuusika fännide ette raskest õnnetusest läbi ime tervenenud  DJ Paul van Dyk.  
DJ vigastas end veebruari keskel Hollandis Utrechti linnas toimunud State of Trance 750 festivalil, kus ta kukkus lavalt alla ning toimetati kiirabiga haiglasse. « Sain tõsise ajukahjustuse ja vigastasin selgroogu. Mu kehal oli palju verevalumeid ja kuklas lahtine haav,» ütles DJ Paul van Dyk ajakirjale Billboard.
Artist pidi õppima uuesti käima, rääkima ja sööma. DJ sõnul võib minna aasta kuni kaks, enne kui ta lõplikult taastub ning see tee saab tema jaoks olema väga keeruline.
Eestis on Paul van Dyk käinud mitmeid kordi, kuid paljude jaoks on vähe tuntud fakt tema koostööst dirigent Paavo Järvi ja Frankfurdi Raadio Sümfooniaorkestriga. «Kui ma selle orkestri peadirigent olin, siis püüdsime igal hooajal ühe veidi teistmoodi projekti teha, et saaksime saali nooremat publikut. Soovisime neile orkestri kõla tutvustada,» ütles Paavo Järvi, kelle teed ristusid läbi Music Discoveri projekti ka DJ Paul van Dykiga.
Artisti taust oli dirigendile pigem võõras, kuid koostöö kohta jätkub Järvil vaid kiidusõnu. «Mina ei olnud tema nime varem kuulnud, kuid sain lõpuks teada, kui tuntud ja oma ala guru ta on. Kogu Paul van Dyki tiim on erakordselt professionaalne. Bändid ja lauljad, kellega nad koostööd teevad, loevad kõik nooti ning teavad väga täpselt, kuidas midagi toimub. Pigem on klassikalises muusikas rohkem sellist boheemlust ja intuitsiooni peale minekut, elektroonilises muusikas peab aga kõik absoluutselt täpselt rütmi sisse ära mahtuma. Seal pole võimalust näiteks aeglustada või spontaanselt midagi kiiremini teha. Mul pidi meie projekti puhul metronoom kõrval olema, et saaks orkestri täpselt tempos hoida,» rääkis Järvi.
Paavo Järvi sai ühes klubis osa ka Paul van Dyki esinemisest. «Seal oli tuhandeid inimesi, väga ebareaalne kogemus, kui võrrelda sellega, mida ma tavaliselt teen. Nägin tema ampluaad ja mahtu, mis oli väga vahva elamus. Ma ise ei ole selle valdkonna spetsialist, kuid kõik kes temast räägivad, teevad seda erakordselt ülistavalt. Tippu jõuda on raske ja veel raskem on seal püsida. Paul van Dyk on suutnud seda teha. Selliseid inimesi tuleb austada,» kiitis Järvi ja lisas, et DJ esinemist tasub juba lihtsalt huvi pärast vaatama minna.
16. juulil Tallinna lauluväljakul toimuval Electronic Family festivalil astuvad üles DJ-d Paul van Dyk, Above & Beyond, Aly & Fila, Christian Burns, Cosmic Gate, Feel, Orkidea, Orjan Nilsen, Erkki Sarapuu ja Shogun.
Electronic Family festivali on Hollandis peetud alates 2011. aastast. Ürituse peakorraldaja ALDA Events viib igal aastal läbi kuni 40 riigis kokku üle 160 show, millest saab osa rohkem kui 1,5 miljonit inimest.
http://kultuur.postimees.ee/v2/3762387/paavo-jaervi-paul-van-dykist-tippu-jouda-on-raske-ja-veel-raskem-on-seal-puesida

PAAVO JÄRVI - ESTONIA'S 'LUCKY MAN'

euronews.com
19/07/2016
Being by the shores of the Baltic Sea is special in itself. Now, imagine the magic of Sibelius’ Violin Concerto, evoked by Viktoria Mullova’s art.
Such delights are brought together each summer in Pärnu, Estonia’s cultural capital. Thanks to its music festival created in 2010 by its famous conductor Paavo Järvi together with his family; different generations united by the same passion.
Pärnu has always been a crossroads for artists and musicians; a renowned seaside resort in the past, today back to its former glory, it boasts picturesque dachas and listed sights, such as the Ammende Villa, a Liberty building where “Musica” had the chance to meet Paavo Järvi.
“I grew up in Tallinn but every summer for three months we spent our holidays in Pärnu. It was not unusual for us to see famous violinist David Oistrakh. I even met Dmitri Shostakovic, and various artists like Gidon Kremer”, Maestro Järvi explained.
“I bring here my kids who live in America, and they now say ‘Papa, we’re going home’. There’s nothing better for me if I hear them saying ‘we’re going home to Pärnu’. That means something as an Estonian, of course,” he added. 
One half consists of Estonian musicians, the other is made up from artists Paavo met during his successful conducting career, the festival’s orchestra is now ready to take flight and start touring Europe.
“As little as we get some sleep here, and as much as we work here, somehow there is an enormous sense of accomplishment, and adrenaline, and good music-making; every summer I am richer by getting to know very close and personally some of the greatest musicians that are alive today,” said Järvi.
Apart from the dissemination of contemporary pieces and music from Nordic countries that are barely known, such as Nielsen’s Second Symphony, the festival boasts the Järvi Academy, a series of master classes given by brothers Paavo and Krjstian, and their father, the celebrated Neeme Järvi, a peerless teacher. 
“Conducting is such a combination of everything, he says. My eyes are telling you something: ‘Do that!’… ‘Make that!’” said Neeme Järvi. “Your wishes and your eyes… you have to talk with… I’m talking to you, now… I’m talking to you, now! Ok, you see, I’m doing something with my eyes, and you’re laughing already, why? Because I’m talking without saying anything!” 
Loyal to its philosophy, the festival has also presented a contemporary piece by Estonian composer Erkki-Sven Tüür.
“We are lucky, us conductors, because we wake up in the morning and after a cup of coffee our so-called job is to deal with the greatest geniuses that have ever lived: Mozart, Mahler, Beethoven… so, that’s not a bad job, actually. If you conduct a Sibelius’ symphony, if you conduct a Mahler symphony… you have no right to complain, you are a lucky man!”
http://www.euronews.com/2016/07/19/paavo-jarvi-estonia-s-lucky-man

Saturday, July 16, 2016

Die Heimat des Paavo Järvi

Weser-kurier
Christoph Forsthoff
15.07.2016

Im estnischen Pärnu verantwortet der Bremer Stardirigent ein spannendes Festival

Verbindet Arbeit und Sommerfrische: Paavo Järvi am Strand von Pärnu. (fr, Kaupo Kikkas)
Nun ist der 53-Jährige zurückgekehrt an den Traumort seiner Kindheit. Zumindest für zwei Wochen. Der inzwischen nicht nur bei der Deutschen Kammerphilharmonie Bremen, sondern weltweit gefeierte Dirigent hat dort 2010 das Pärnu Music Festival sowie die Järvi-Academy ins Leben gerufen. Und setzte damit eine Tradition fort, die Geiger-Legende David Oistrach in dem 40 000-Einwohner-Städtchen begründet hatte: Bis zu seinem Tod 1974 lud der Russe allsommerlich Kollegen und Musikstudenten zu spontanen Konzerten in seine kleine grüne Datscha ein. „Diese Idee wollten wir aufgreifen, Musiker aus aller Welt zusammenholen, um hier eine Gemeinschaft und ein Gemeinschaftserlebnis zu schaffen“, erzählt Järvi. Wobei letzteres keineswegs auf Meisterkurse, Kammerorchester und Sinfonietta, Jugendsinfonieorchester und das Estonian Festival Orchestra beschränkt bleibt, sondern für ihn selbst auch ein großes Familientreffen bedeutet: Allein zehn Järvis – nicht nur mit Taktstock, sondern auch an Flöte, Geige, Bratsche, Cello und Klavier – finden sich unter den 200 Festival-Musikern, zahlreiche weitere Verwandte genießen wie die Urlauber aus Tallinn, Finnland oder Deutschland die Sommerfrische zum Entspannen.
Das gilt auch für Paavo Järvis zwölf- und neunjährige Töchter, Lea und Ingrid, die ihm schon mal ungeduldig zu verstehen geben, dass es nun Zeit für den Strand sei – um den Vater dann einfach an die Hände zu nehmen und aus seinem Dirigier-Meisterkurs zu entführen. Kein Problem für die Studenten, da auch noch Neeme Järvi seine Hände im Spiel hat und man dem Sohn ebenso aufmerksam lauscht wie dem berühmten Vater.
„Unsere Technik und unsere Prinzipien fußen auf denselben Ideen – wir sind sehr eng und natürlich miteinander verbunden“, sagt Järvi Junior. „Umgekehrt hat er durch mich Bruckner schätzen gelernt und dirigiert inzwischen selbst dessen Werke.“
Nun, an diesem Kurs-Nachmittag geht es nicht um große Bögen und Bruckner-Welten, sondern schlicht ums exakte Zählen – und das passt Neeme Järvi so gar nicht bei dem jungen Bayer Kai Johannes Polzhofer. „Eins – zwei – drei – vier, eins – zwei – drei – vier“, insistiert das Familienoberhaupt, als der Dirigierschüler in Rachmaninows zweitem Klavierkonzert die Musiker des Jugendorchesters einfach nicht in den Griff bekommt. Folgsam tritt der Sohn zurück und überlässt dem Vater das Erklär-Feld – um dann pragmatisch Polzhofers‘ Arm zu ergreifen und dessen Dirigierbewegung ins Taktmaß zu führen.
„Die Järvis sind in Estland Nationalhelden“, meint Andres Siitan, langjähriger Manager des Nationalen Symphonieorchesters. „Paavo hat nicht nur viele Aufnahmen mit dem Nationalen Sinfonieorchester gemacht und mit seiner Sibelius-Kantaten-Einspielung den ersten Grammy in der estnischen Geschichte gewonnen, sondern das Orchester auch weltweit bekannt gemacht.“ Und da die Esten ein Volk seien, das die Musik besonders liebe, wisse man zu schätzen, was die Familie und ihr Wirken für das Land und dessen Bekanntheit in der Welt bedeute. Was der Stadt Pärnu anno 2002 sogar einen nagelneuen, akustisch eindrucksvollen Konzertsaal beschert hat: Der wirkt hier mit seinen 1000 Plätzen zwar etwas überdimensioniert – und wird außerhalb der Festivalzeit als Konferenzhalle genutzt, zumal sich das Städtchen nach dem Sommertourismus in einen neunmonatigen Winterschlaf begibt – doch wer hätte der berühmten Familie diesen Herzenswunsch verwehren wollen?
Eine Familie, die während des Festivals nicht als Star-Ensemble daherkommt: Während Papa Järvi sich nur zu gern ins Gespräch verwickeln lässt, huscht sein Sohn kurz vor Beginn des nächtlichen Auftritts des Hába Quartetts noch in die Kirchenbänke von St. Elisabeth – um beim Schlussapplaus die Tschechen mit seinem Smartphone zu fotografieren. „Paavo ist einfach ein Meister der Kommunikation“, meint beim anschließenden Musikertreff im Cafe „Passion“ DKB-Konzertmeister Florian Donderer, der nun schon im sechsten Sommer in gleicher Funktion im hiesigen Festivalorchester mitwirkt. „Er sieht sich als Kammermusiker unter Kammermusikern, ist offen für Impulse und vermag diese weiterzugeben.“ Sei es nun in der Musik – oder eben auch in seiner Heimat, der Järvi mit seinen Urlaubserinnerungen aus Kindertagen neue Impulse für den Tourismus gegeben hat.
„Dies ist ein magischer Ort." Paavo Järvi
http://www.weser-kurier.de/bremen/bremen-kultur-freizeit_artikel,-Die-Heimat-des-Paavo-Jaervi-_arid,1417722.html

Paavo Järvi Paul van Dykist: tippu jõuda on raske ja veel raskem on seal püsida

Postimees
Kirke Ert
12 juuli 2016

Laupäeval astub Tallinna lauluväljakul Electronic Family festivalil tantsumuusika fännide ette raskest õnnetusest läbi ime tervenenud  DJ Paul van Dyk.
DJ vigastas end veebruari keskel Hollandis Utrechti linnas toimunud State of Trance 750 festivalil, kus ta kukkus lavalt alla ning toimetati kiirabiga haiglasse. « Sain tõsise ajukahjustuse ja vigastasin selgroogu. Mu kehal oli palju verevalumeid ja kuklas lahtine haav,» ütles DJ Paul van Dyk ajakirjale Billboard.
Artist pidi õppima uuesti käima, rääkima ja sööma. DJ sõnul võib minna aasta kuni kaks, enne kui ta lõplikult taastub ning see tee saab tema jaoks olema väga keeruline.
Eestis on Paul van Dyk käinud mitmeid kordi, kuid paljude jaoks on vähe tuntud fakt tema koostööst dirigent Paavo Järvi ja Frankfurdi Raadio Sümfooniaorkestriga. «Kui ma selle orkestri peadirigent olin, siis püüdsime igal hooajal ühe veidi teistmoodi projekti teha, et saaksime saali nooremat publikut. Soovisime neile orkestri kõla tutvustada,» ütles Paavo Järvi, kelle teed ristusid läbi Music Discoveri projekti ka DJ Paul van Dykiga.
Artisti taust oli dirigendile pigem võõras, kuid koostöö kohta jätkub Järvil vaid kiidusõnu. «Mina ei olnud tema nime varem kuulnud, kuid sain lõpuks teada, kui tuntud ja oma ala guru ta on. Kogu Paul van Dyki tiim on erakordselt professionaalne. Bändid ja lauljad, kellega nad koostööd teevad, loevad kõik nooti ning teavad väga täpselt, kuidas midagi toimub. Pigem on klassikalises muusikas rohkem sellist boheemlust ja intuitsiooni peale minekut, elektroonilises muusikas peab aga kõik absoluutselt täpselt rütmi sisse ära mahtuma. Seal pole võimalust näiteks aeglustada või spontaanselt midagi kiiremini teha. Mul pidi meie projekti puhul metronoom kõrval olema, et saaks orkestri täpselt tempos hoida,» rääkis Järvi.
Paavo Järvi sai ühes klubis osa ka Paul van Dyki esinemisest. «Seal oli tuhandeid inimesi, väga ebareaalne kogemus, kui võrrelda sellega, mida ma tavaliselt teen. Nägin tema ampluaad ja mahtu, mis oli väga vahva elamus. Ma ise ei ole selle valdkonna spetsialist, kuid kõik kes temast räägivad, teevad seda erakordselt ülistavalt. Tippu jõuda on raske ja veel raskem on seal püsida. Paul van Dyk on suutnud seda teha. Selliseid inimesi tuleb austada,» kiitis Järvi ja lisas, et DJ esinemist tasub juba lihtsalt huvi pärast vaatama minna.
16. juulil Tallinna lauluväljakul toimuval Electronic Family festivalil astuvad üles DJ-d Paul van Dyk, Above & Beyond, Aly & Fila, Christian Burns, Cosmic Gate, Feel, Orkidea, Orjan Nilsen, Erkki Sarapuu ja Shogun.
Electronic Family festivali on Hollandis peetud alates 2011. aastast. Ürituse peakorraldaja ALDA Events viib igal aastal läbi kuni 40 riigis kokku üle 160 show, millest saab osa rohkem kui 1,5 miljonit inimest.
http://kultuur.postimees.ee/v2/3762387/paavo-jaervi-paul-van-dykist-tippu-jouda-on-raske-ja-veel-raskem-on-seal-puesida

Friday, July 01, 2016

Järvi und Grimaud beeindrucken beim Klavierfestival Ruhr


derwesten.de
Martin Schrahn
29.O6.2016

Pianistin Hélène Grimaud.

Essen. Starker Auftritt von Dirigent Järvi und Solistin Grimaud: Bei Brahms in der Philharmonie Essen regierte der Mut zu Schärfe und Schroffheit.

Er war ein Grübler und Zweifler, sich selbst der unerbittlichste Kritiker. Johannes Brahms komponierte sein sinfonisches Werk, die Klavierkonzerte eingerechnet, im Lichte allergrößter Unbehaglichkeit. Weil über ihm der tiefe Schatten Beethovens lag. Brahms’ Ringen mit der Materie spiegelt sich ebenso in der Musik wie sein intensives, oft aufgewühltes Gefühlsleben.

Dies alles hörbar zu machen, die Musik unter Strom zu setzen und uns auf die Stuhlkante zu treiben, ist nun der Deutschen Kammerphilharmonie Bremen unter Leitung von Paavo Järvi als Gäste des Klavierfestivals Ruhr in Essens Philharmonie aufs Beste gelungen. Mitreißend die Deutung der 4. Sinfonie, beeindruckend die Interpretation des 1. Klavierkonzerts, mit der Solistin Hélène Grimaud.

Järvi und sein Orchester zelebrieren große Dramen

Alles klingt rau und ungeschliffen, erfrischend unverbraucht. Järvi und sein Orchester zelebrieren große Dramen, die Musik bahnt sich fiebrig ihren Weg, nur bisweilen gibt es Inseln ernster Melancholie, als trügerische Ruhe vor dem nächsten Sturm.

So schroff, derart scharf gezeichnet sind Brahms’ Klänge selten zu hören, und im Klavierkonzert führt das teils zur dynamischen Unwucht. Dann muss Grimaud die Muskeln spielen lassen, doch eigentlich ist ihre Welt die Sensibilität. Sie formt und brilliert, markiert die Rhythmen klar, meidet indes jede Überzeichnung. Ihre Leidenschaft ist kontrolliert, im Toben der Elemente plädiert sie virtuos für ein wenig Mäßigung.

Starker emotionaler Zugriff

Gleichwohl ist dies kein Kräftemessen zwischen Solistin und Dirigent. Beide stehen für einen starken emotionalen Zugriff. Doch Järvi will die Grenzen ausloten, wie in Brahms’ 4. Die Musik ist wuchtig, manchmal nahezu aufgekratzt, ekstatisch. Und fast atemlos ziehen die Variationen der finalen Passacaglia an uns vorbei – wie eine Vorausahnung des nervösen Zeitalters, der Wende zum 20. Jahrhundert.

Das Klavierfestival geht weiter, u.a. mit Jan Lisiecki, 4. Juli, Stadthalle Mülheim.

http://www.derwesten.de/kultur/jaervi-und-grimaud-beeindrucken-beim-klavierfestival-ruhr-id11961494.html

Festival, mille üle Eesti vôib uhke olla.

Kontsert
Hele-Maria Taimla
Juuli 2016

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Prix de la critique : palmarès 2015-2016


Personnalité musicale de l'année : Paavo Järvi, directeur musical de l'Orchestre de Paris de 2010 à 2016


Paavo Järvi in Paris - Impressive farewell concert of Paavo Järvi, 16th of June 2016


Kulturkompasset
Henning Høholt
27/06/2017



Thank you to Paavo Järvi

PARIS/FRANCE: Paavo Järvis farewell concert from his Orchestra de Paris became one of the highlights who will be remembered for a long time. He has programmed the demanding and fantastic Symfoni no 3 by Mahler for this last evening, which includes the female and the children choirs of Orchestra de Paris plus the great Alto soloist Michelle DeYoung.

High Quality

With the high quality presented to night and through these years with Paavo Järvi as music chief and chief conductor of Orchestra de Paris, he is underlining its status as one of the worlds leading symphony orchestras, a position that it has been building up through its hard, serious, and very musically series of concerts through these many years with Järvi. And for the whole symphonic interested listeners and viewers through plenty of TV concerts at Mezzo and other places. But also, and not to forget from his predecessors through the history of the Orchestra.

However. It always need the right man at the chief position to continue to hold an orchestra at such a high quality level. It is build on several different basics. The personality of the leadership, the administration, and last, but not least its musicians. And this orchestra has this kind of musicians. Congratulations, and thank you to Paavo Järvi.

Hopefully Daniel Harding, who is taking over the music chief position, will manage to keep the high standard. He has the musicians.

Details in Mahlers 3rd. Symphony:


Expressive start with Horns and Trombones, – and wonderful Trombone solo, (- which is being wonderfully repeated half an hour later, introducing the end of first part). in the first 40 min long part, we then went back to this fanfare opening themes even more beautiful played and with an even better Trombone solo. Guillaume Cotter-Dumoulin (?). Extraordinary.

In the 3rd part the beautiful expressive long mini horn solo in several parts outside the hall was being beautifully formed and played.

The 4th part opens with a beautifully light played symphonic filigran network around the Alto soloist Michel DeYoung, perfect with a warm sound, good diction. Words by Nietzsche, opening to the great choire parts, where we enjoyd the 64 children choire singers and (app) 63 female choir members of the Orchestra de Paris Choire. During the way beautiful violin solos by the concertmaster Philippe Aïche. The splendid choir work is lead by the choire master Lionel Sow,

After a speech by the general manager and handing over a memorial to Paavo Järvi the orchestra surprised him with one of his favorite music pieces, unfortunately, I am not sure, but was it Sibelius: “Incidental Music”?

The last evening for Paavo Järvi was followed by a reception where 500 guests, of course including the whole orchestra, who enjoyed a marvelous service with canapés a lot of refreshments, and excellent demanding, but relaxed entertainment from the orchestra members.

However, Paavo Järvi will not loose the contact with Orchestra de Paris, he will return regularly to the orchestra as Invited guest conductor.



Paavo Järvi congratulated by Henning Høholt at the farewell reception 16th June 2016 at Philharmonie de Paris.


http://www.kulturkompasset.com/2016/06/27/paavo-jarvi-in-paris/